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About this collection

The Hamilton Intelligencer collection covers 1828-1856.

 

The first issue of the Hamilton Intelligencer was published on August 18, 1828, in Hamilton, the seat of Butler County, Ohio, as a revival of the Hamilton Intelligencer & Advertiser which had run 1821-1825. Its editor intended it to be a "common vehicle of intelligence on the various subjects, that come within the scope of newspaper publications: a medium of imparting information to his readers, interesting and useful to all, and injurious to none." It initially supported John Quincy Adams and the National Republican Party; in 1834, it became Whig in politics, and in 1854, Republican.

 

Like other mid-19th century newspapers, the Intelligencer covered state and national politics, including legislation and elections, as well as foreign (international) news. It usually devoted at least one page of each weekly issue to information of local significance, including marriage and death notices; business and want advertisements; church information; and court proceedings. The Intelligencer also printed poetry, essays, and articles on agriculture and other topics of general interest.

 

The Intelligencer changed hands several times during its 35-year run. A few months after James B. Camron established the paper, John Woods, local lawyer and member of the United States House of Representatives, became editor, with Edward Shaeffer serving as publisher. Other editors and publishers included: Michael B. Sargeant, Richard H.L. Neale and Lewis D. Campbell. Isaac M. Walters became sole editor and proprietor in 1838, and briefly changed the name of the publication to Hamilton Ohio Intelligencer in 1838. It became known as the Hamilton Intelligencer once again in 1840, when William C. Howells took over. After several more changes in leadership, the Intelligencer was merged into the Hamilton Telegraph in 1862.

 
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